Conflict in Front of the Kids: Why Not to Do It and How to Avoid It

We recently posted an article on our social media about Parental Alienation and its harmful effect on children. But recent child development research shows that even experiencing lower levels of parental conflict can lead to mental health problems for children who are caught in the middle.

The findings of a new Arizona State University research study, titled “Longitudinal Effects of Post-Divorce Interparental Conflict on Children’s Mental Health Problems Through Fear of Abandonment” were published just last week in the Child Development journal. The study, as the title suggests, focused on the lasting effects that post-divorce parental conflicts have on their children’s mental health.

From 2012 to 2015, the researchers surveyed families participating in the ASU New Beginnings Program, asking 559 children (aged 9-18) about their exposure to conflict. The questions included topics like whether after their parents’ divorce their parents fought in front of them, spoke poorly about one another, asked them to carry messages to one another, etc. The study ultimately found that children exposed to parental conflict were more likely to report worrying about being abandoned by one or both parents. Furthermore, children who reported higher fear of abandonment were also more likely to report additional mental health problems 11 months later.

Before conducting this study, researchers hypothesized that kids who had strong relationships with one or both of their parents would experience less fear of abandonment and fewer mental health problems, since strong parent-child relationships generally create a stress buffer for children. However, they did not find a general buffering effect of parenting in this situation.

Karey O’Hara, a research assistant professor of psychology at ASU and the first author on the paper, stated “This was the most surprising finding for us. Good parenting is a very strong and powerful protective factor for all children, especially after a separation or divorce. But based on prior research, we know that the effect of good parenting is complicated in separated/divorced families.” She then added that although good parenting is protective, it may not be enough to cancel out the negative effects of conflict.

Parents can do something about it, though. In her research paper, O’Hara urges parents not to argue or fight in front of the children. She suggests that parents be extra careful when they’re around the other parent if there is a chance for conflict, and that parents make a conscious effort not to say things that might make their children feel like they are caught in the middle and have to pick sides. In other words, she suggests no badmouthing the other parent or asking the child to spy or act as a messenger.

It is also important, particularly given the findings of the study, “for parents to make sure that their children know that although they are separated or divorced, they will continue to care for them,” in order to allay any fears of abandonment that the child might have.

Going through a separation, a divorce, or a contested custody case can certainly be difficult for children that are experiencing it. If you are a parent who is going through, or has gone through, a divorce or separation, take Karey O’Hara’s advice and try to avoid conflict with your ex and putting your children in the middle as much as possible. And if you don’t feel like you can control and mitigate conflict on your own, there is no shame in seeking help—ultimately it will make you a better parent and your children happier and healthier.

By: Logan Matura

 

At the Law Firm of Gary J. Frank P.C., our Arizona Family Law Attorneys Gary Frank, Hanna Amar, and Logan Matura are strong litigators and compassionate counselors. Gary Frank is a Phoenix Family Law Attorney with over 30 years of experience as a litigator and mediator. He has also acted in the capacity of a Judge Pro Tempore in the Maricopa County Superior Court, and served on the Governor’s Child Abuse Prevention Task Force. Law firm Partner, Hanna Amar is a highly-skilled Arizona Family Law Attorney with a passion for Family Law and children’s issues. She has extensive courtroom experience, and is also a certified mediator. Hanna has also acted as the President of the Young Lawyer’s Division of the Maricopa County Bar Association. Associate Attorney Logan Matura is an Arizona Family Law Attorney who received her Juris Doctor degree from New York Law School in Manhattan, NY. While in law school, she served as an intern for a Family Court judge in the Bronx, NY, and was a member of the Family Attorneys Mobilizing club. Our firm handles Family Law cases in the areas of divorce, custody (now called “Legal Decision-Making and Parenting Time), relocation (move-away), division of property, spousal and child support, modification actions, enforcement actions, grandparent and step-parent and non-parent rights, as well as other matters pertaining to families and children. If you are in need of a consultation, call us today at 602-383-3610; or you can contact us by email through our website at www.garyfranklaw.com.   We look forward to hearing from you.

 

What You Post on Social Media CAN Hurt You In a Family Law Case

These days, most teens and adults have at least one social media page, whether it be on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, TikTok, LinkedIn, or some other platform. Since so many adults have social media accounts, many attorneys have witnessed mistakes that have been made on social media which negatively impacted their family law case. In fact, we have won cases for our clients simply because of what an opposing party, in a moment of anger, posted on their social media.

You may wonder how what you post online can have a negative impact on your divorce or custody case. I’ll give you a few examples, some of which are based off of real cases that our firm has handled in the past:

  • In a spousal maintenance case, a husband claimed to be earning very little income, yet he posted on Match.com that he earned over $150,000 per year. This post was then used against him to show that he made more than he originally said he did.

 

  • In a custody case, a mother who denied doing drugs and partying was posting photos on Instagram in which she was at bars and nightclubs holding bottles of alcohol with others doing drugs in the background. This was then used against her in court when determining parenting time and legal decision making.

 

  • In a divorce case that started off amicably, a husband ranted on Facebook about his soon to be ex-wife after a heated argument. A mutual friend screenshotted the post and sent it to the wife, who became enraged and decided she no longer wanted to be amicable. This led to a litigation that went on for years and cost a great deal of money for both parties.

 

  • A mother posted photographs on Instagram of herself and her young daughter with Mother’s new boyfriend. An investigation turned up that the man had a long criminal record, including convictions for domestic violence and child abuse. Needless to say, the mother lost custody of that child.

 

  • In a high-conflict custody matter, an angry father made threats against the mother on his Facebook page, which resulted in the Court awarding mother sole custody with only limited supervised visitation for Father.

 

If you are active on social media, it’s important to learn the best practices while going through a family law case. Here are some important tips:

  1. Be careful who you add and accept on social media. We all want to have lots of friends and followers on social media, but some of these “friends” can hurt you. That follow-request that you accepted, despite not really knowing who they are, could be a private investigator or your ex on a burner account trying to see your posts. Consider making your accounts private and be careful whose requests you accept.
  2. Remove your ex from your social media page and consider removing their family and friends too. It is not uncommon for one of these types of “friends” or followers to pass along a copy of your comments or photos, and before you even suspect it, that post shows up in court and is used as evidence against you at trial. These types of “friends” or followers are often the ones who are looking into everything you say or do on social media and trying to find something damaging to your case.
  3. Don’t post when you are angry. Nothing good can come from posting while you are angry. Try and channel your anger into something positive, or vent to family, friends, or a mental health specialist. If you are concerned that you can’t control your posts when you are angry, it may be wise to take a break from social media until your case is over.
  4. Do not talk badly about your ex or their family and friends. It’s easy sometimes in the heat of the moment to post something negative about your ex. It may not even be something that is obviously towards them but could be something subtle and passive aggressive. These comments could be taken out of context, or otherwise used against you in a court hearing. No matter how subtle you think the message may be, it is never a good idea to post things about your ex or their family and friends.
  5. Do not talk badly about yourself, your family or friends, or provide information that could possibly be reflect negatively on you. Just as you shouldn’t post about your ex and their family and friends, you shouldn’t post about yourself and your family and friends either. Again, things can be misconstrued. I recently saw an old friend post something on Twitter to the effect of “the last year has taught me that nobody hates me more than I hate me.” If they were in a family law case, this post would absolutely be used against them, even if they were just joking and did not actually mean what they wrote.
  6. Do not post comments or photos of yourself, your family, or your friends doing anything illegal or which may appear to be illegal, inappropriate, or compromising. This pretty much speaks for itself, but don’t post anything that would very clearly negatively reflect on you, your family, or your friends. There is just no need to post the pictures of you at your office holiday party taking tequila shots with your boss. Keep those for yourself—or maybe don’t take those pictures at all.
  7. Do not post about your children. If you have kids, it’s best to keep them off of your social media pages altogether at this time. Of course, you should continue to share special moments and take photos with your kids. However, it may be beneficial to take a break from posting about them on social media until your case is over. While photos of you and your kids or posts about them may be totally acceptable at any other time, while there is a case going on, you are under a microscope. Certain photos could be misinterpreted or there could be something in them you don’t even notice that could be used to call your parenting into question. The same goes for the stories you tell or comments you make about your kids—you just never know how something may be interpreted.
  8. Do not post about your income, or really anything about money, at all. There is nothing good that can come from writing about your income or your money on social media! It’s really as simple as that!
  9. Do not discuss your case publicly on social media. Again, nothing good can come from posting about your case publicly on social media. It will not look good for you with the judge, and as always, something may be misinterpreted or taken the wrong way by your ex or their lawyer.
  10. Do not post information about conversations with your attorney. This could be construed as a waiver of your attorney-client privilege, making admissible things that were said in confidence to your lawyer. Just don’t do it!

Social media can be a really fun part of our lives. But as you can see, it can significantly impact many areas of a family law case in a negative way. As a rule of thumb, if you wouldn’t want a judge or your ex’s attorney seeing the post or photo, don’t post it! And if you are questioning whether you’d be okay with them seeing the post or photo, just don’t post it!

By Logan Matura

 

At the Law Firm of Gary J. Frank P.C., our Arizona Family Law Attorneys Gary Frank, Hanna Amar, and Logan Matura are strong litigators and compassionate counselors. Gary Frank is a Phoenix Family Law Attorney with over 30 years of experience as a litigator and mediator. He has also acted in the capacity of a Judge Pro Tempore in the Maricopa County Superior Court, and served on the Governor’s Child Abuse Prevention Task Force. Law firm Partner, Hanna Amar is a highly-skilled Arizona Family Law Attorney with a passion for Family Law and children’s issues. She has extensive courtroom experience, and is also a certified mediator. Hanna has also acted as the President of the Young Lawyer’s Division of the Maricopa County Bar Association. Associate Attorney Logan Matura is an Arizona Family Law Attorney who received her Juris Doctor degree from New York Law School in Manhattan, NY. While in law school, she served as an intern for a Family Court judge in the Bronx, NY, and was a member of the Family Attorneys Mobilizing club. Our firm handles Family Law cases in the areas of divorce, custody (now called “Legal Decision-Making and Parenting Time), relocation (move-away), division of property, spousal and child support, modification actions, enforcement actions, grandparent and step-parent and non-parent rights, as well as other matters pertaining to families and children. If you are in need of a consultation, call us today at 602-383-3610; or you can contact us by email through our website at www.garyfranklaw.com.   We look forward to hearing from you.

 

THE AMAZING POWER OF EMPATHY

          There’s this thing called “Empathy.”  And it’s a powerful force.  When I don’t see eye-to-eye with someone, I try very hard to understand why that person feels the way they do, and why their reality is so different from mine.  When I take that approach, I am usually able to comprehend their logic or at least catch a glimpse of where that person is coming from, even if I don’t agree with their reasoning or conclusions.
          Unfortunately, many people are unwilling or unable to see a problem through another person’s eyes.  And in today’s political environment, empathy and compassion are often considered a liability. Why? Maybe people are afraid that trying to understand another’s point of view will somehow be seen as a tacit admission that the person is right.  Maybe they fear that conceding a point, even a small one, is tantamount to losing the debate.  Or maybe they’re just afraid of being wrong.
          But “Empathy” is not a weakness – it’s a strength.  Failing to consider a problem from the opposing point of view often leads to a stalemate and continued conflict.  Refusing to make even a minimal concession or a reasonable compromise only assures that competing parties will never be able to bridge the gap and resolve their differences.  It heightens the conflict and can cause a small spark to become a raging fire.
          When two people are going through a divorce, it’s a scary and emotional time in their lives.  They may wonder, “What’s going to happen to my children?” or “How can I protect the assets that I’ve worked my whole life to accumulate?”  It can feel as though the ground beneath them has fallen away and they have nothing to hold onto.  Fear grips them.  And eventually their fear morphs into anger.  They run out and look for the meanest, most aggressive attorney they can find.  But they soon learn that the divorce litigation, which is an adversarial process to begin with, has only increased their fear and inflamed their anger.
          With this mindset, it is hard to make concessions or compromises.  It is difficult to put yourself in the shoes the other person (who, by now, may seem like an enemy) — but that is exactly what you need to do.  Because being able to view the situation through the eyes of that person will enable you to better understand their perspective — their fears, their insecurities, their unstated needs.  And that insight, along with a willingness to make reasonable concessions, could allow you to resolve your dispute amicably, and save thousands of dollars in the process.
          A father going through a divorce might be afraid that the mother is trying to take his children away from him.  A wife who was a stay-at-home mom for many years might be afraid that she won’t be able to support herself after the divorce.  By trying to understand those fears, you are better able to address the problem.  Empathy also allows you control your own fear and insecurity.  You are less likely to be angry with your soon-to-be ex-spouse if you understand that his/her motives are not evil.  That person is just fearful, like you are.
          In the end, empathy enables you to comprehend the other party’s state of mind, which may result in finding a solution that allows you to meet their needs without compromising your own.

 

 

At the Law Firm of Gary J. Frank P.C., both Gary Frank and attorney Hanna Amar are strong litigators and compassionate counselors. Gary Frank is a Family Law Attorney with over 30 years of experience as a litigator and mediator. He has also acted in the capacity of a Judge Pro Tempore in the Maricopa County Superior Court, and served on the Governor’s Child Abuse Prevention Task Force. Hanna Amar is a highly-skilled attorney with a passion for Family Law and children’s issues. She has extensive courtroom experience, and is also a certified mediator. Hanna has also acted as the President of the Young Lawyer’s Division of the Maricopa County Bar Association.  We handle Family Law cases in the areas of divorce, custody (now called “Legal Decision-Making and Parenting Time), relocation (move-away), division of property, spousal and child support, modification actions, enforcement actions, grandparent and step-parent and non-parent rights, as well as other matters pertaining to families and children. If you are in need of a consultation, call us today at 602-383-3610; or you can contact us by email through our website at www.garyfranklaw.com.   We look forward to hearing from you.

 

WHY FEAR & ANGER ARE YOUR WORST ENEMY IN FAMILY COURT

In all our years of practicing Family Law, we have found that the predominant and most destructive emotion among parties to a divorce or custody case is FEAR.
Fear is a primal human emotion.  It comes into play when we feel threatened – and when a marriage is crumbling and people are considering divorce, there is plenty to feel threatened about:  “How am I going to survive without my spouse’s income?  Do I have to give her half of my money and property?”  “Will he be able to take proper care of the children when I am no longer there to supervise?”  “Who gets to stay in the house?”  “What will happen when my spousal support ends?” . . .
It’s no wonder why people are fearful – when a marriage is unraveling, both the husband and wife face a scary and uncertain future, and so do the children.  Add to that the adversarial nature of a court proceeding, and you have a very combustible mix.  All it takes is one little spark to ignite a raging fire.
When people are feeling out of control and not communicating (as is the case with most divorcing couples), the fear that is building up inside them can easily morph into another human emotion – ANGER – and that anger can manifest itself in any number of ways:  Discussions can deteriorate into shouting matches; a spouse can “shut down” and become unwilling to talk; a person can become obstinate and unreasonable; or one spouse may seek to hurt or punish the other.  Anger can lead to territorial battles over money or property, or even time with the children.
We are all human, and these responses to fear are certainly understandable, but they are unhealthy and can lead to contentiousness and long-term problems.  I’ve seen it a thousand times:  An angry spouse runs out and gets an attorney to use as a “hired-gun,” with the goal of inflicting maximum damage. — The other spouse retaliates by bringing in their own “hired-gun.” — And before they know it, the parties are waging an all-out litigation war, with money spilling to the ground like water from a barrel shot full of holes.  In a war like that, nobody wins.  Often, given the parties’ seething anger and lack of communication, the stage is set for a series of future battles, where the former husband and wife return to court over-and-over again, during the course of many years, to re-litigate issues involving custody of children, or parenting time, or support.  Hard-earned money that could have been used for retirement, or the kids’ college education, now goes to pay attorneys in an endless war of attrition.
A divorce may include very complicated issues, such as determining legal decision-making authority; parenting time; child support; spousal maintenance (alimony); division of property and debts; appraisal of real estate; or valuation of businesses, stock options, and retirement plans – just to name a few.  Working through these types of issues takes patience and emotional intelligence.  It takes a willingness to put aside fear and anger and address the needs of the parties and the children in a calm, business-like manner.

As we see it, the job of the attorneys in a divorce case is to help the parties carefully untangle the twisted web of issues involving custody, support, property division, and finances without ripping the fabric of “family” (the children will still have two parents, even after the divorce is finalized).  Where children are involved, the lawyers’ primary responsibility is to help the parents build a bridge so that when the divorce is over they will be able to communicate effectively for the benefit of the children.  If the divorce does not involve children, then our job is to find a way to divide assets and debts in a manner that leaves both parties as financially intact as possible.  Obviously, the lawyers cannot accomplish these goals without a buy-in from both parties.  If their actions are ruled by fear and anger, then they will be unable to make responsible decisions, and settlement discussions may be out of the question.  In representing clients over the years, I have seen instances where a party or his attorney elects to take a “slash-and-burn” approach.  When that happens, my job is to aggressively protect and defend my client’s interests.  That means getting tough.  However, even in the midst of the most hotly contested legal dispute, it is in everyone’s best interest to keep the door open to reasonable settlement negotiations – because, in the end, it is the client’s life, and the client’s future, that are at stake – and, in too many cases, when the battle is over and decisions were dictated by fear and anger, the only winners are the lawyers.  But that doesn’t have to happen.  Take charge of your emotions.  Keep your cool.  And approach divorce as if it were a business negotiation.  If you can do that, then you are in control.

 

At the Law Firm of Gary J. Frank P.C., both Gary Frank and attorney Hanna Amar are strong litigators and compassionate counselors. Gary Frank is a Family Law Attorney with over 30 years of experience as a litigator and mediator. He has also acted in the capacity of a Judge Pro Tempore in the Maricopa County Superior Court, and served on the Governor’s Child Abuse Prevention Task Force. Hanna Amar is a highly-skilled attorney with a passion for Family Law and children’s issues. She has extensive courtroom experience, and is also a certified mediator. Hanna is the President of the Young Lawyer’s Division of the Maricopa County Bar Association.  We handle Family Law cases in the areas of divorce, custody (now called “Legal Decision-Making and Parenting Time), relocation (move-away), division of property, spousal and child support, modification actions, enforcement actions, grandparent and non-parent rights, and all other matters pertaining to families and children. If you are in need of a consultation, call us today at 602-383-3610; or you can contact us by email through our website at www.garyfranklaw.com.   We look forward to hearing from you.

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