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Arizona Community Property Attorney

Phoenix Marital Property Division Lawyer

Arizona uses a community property system to divide a couple's assets and debts at the time of divorce. The system is vastly different from the equitable distribution method used by the majority of states. If you are getting divorced, you should seek the advice of a family lawyer who is deeply familiar with Arizona community property rules.

At the Law Office of Gary J. Frank, P.C., we have 30 years of experience dealing with Arizona's community property regime. Led by Arizona property division attorney Gary Frank, we offer comprehensive divorce and community property division services to clients in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Mesa and all surrounding areas.

To arrange a consultation to learn more about community property division, call 602-383-3610 or contact our law firm online.

Understanding Arizona Community Property Division

Arizona is a community property state. That means all assets and debts acquired by either spouse during the marriage are part of the "marital community" and are subject to division, regardless of whose name is on the title. Unless a couple signed a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement that divides property in a different manner, their assets and debts will be divided using community property rules set forth in the Arizona statutes and interpreted by the courts.

Is It Community Property or Separate Property?

Characterizing property correctly is an essential and very complex task requiring an experienced attorney. Our legal team will analyze your property to determine whether it belongs to you separately (which means you get to keep it) or it is part of the community (and therefore must be divided).

The rules have many different nuances and subtleties, but here are some general guidelines:

  • Assets and debts acquired by either spouse during the marriage are almost always community property. This includes income earned by each party from his or her employment, and items purchased using that income.
  • Assets acquired by gift or through inheritance during marriage are separate property.
  • Assets you owned prior to your marriage generally remain separate property.
  • It is possible for your individual pension plan or retirement account to be considered community property, meaning your spouse may be entitled to a share of its value; or it might be considered part community and part separate property (for example, if a party worked for a company for five years before the marriage and five years after the marriage, then only a portion of the funds in the plan would be community property).
  • If you owned a business before marriage, the business itself remains your separate property, but the appreciation in the company's value during the marriage may be community property to which your spouse could have a valid claim.

Transmutation

It is possible for a separate asset to change character during the course of the marriage, ending up as community property by the time of divorce. This is a concept called "transmutation." For example, if you received an inheritance from a grandparent during your marriage, that would normally be your separate property. So long as it is placed in a bank account in your name and not commingled with monies belonging to the marital community, it would remain your separate property. But, if you put that inheritance into a joint bank account in which community monies are deposited and withdrawn, then over time it may be transmuted and become community property. The process of transmutation is confusing and very technical. You can rely on our firm to make sense of it for you.

What About Property You Acquired While Living in Another State?

Arizona is home to many couples who lived and worked in other states before moving here. These couples often own property, such as houses or other real estate, in their former state. For these couples, it is important to realize that Arizona law treats these assets as community property, even if the state in which they were acquired is not a community property state. This concept is known as "quasi-community property." If you own property in other states, Gary J. Frank will help you sort things out.

Contact a Scottsdale Divorce Attorney

When you have questions about community property division or any other family law issue, call 602-383-3610 contact our law firm online to speak with our skilled Arizona family law attorney.

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Gary J. Frank, P.C.
2375 East Camelback Road, Suite 600
Phoenix, AZ 85016
Phone: 602-383-3610
Fax: 602-381-8187
Phoenix Law Office Map

Satellite Offices in Phoenix Metro area:

Paradise Valley:
Gary J. Frank, P.C.
11811 N. Tatum Blvd., Suite 3031
Phoenix, AZ 85028

Scottsdale - Gainey Ranch:
Gary J. Frank, P.C.
7702 E. Doubletree Ranch Road, Suite300
Scottsdale, AZ  85258

Tempe - Hayden Ferry Lake:
Gary J. Frank, P.C.
60 E. Rio Salado Parkway, Suite 800
Tempe, AZ  85281

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